Sally Grant (née McLeod)

Sally Grant grew up in Mille Roches, Ontario





“That was very interesting ‘cause I’m, like, 12. I was really looking forward to the move.

I was enthralled with the big Hartshorne mover thing that came. And you couldn’t believe – we just had these old stone basements and they would put holes in the basement, put the beams in.

And then you sat there with the beams there but you never knew what day you were moving. You don’t know when you’re moving. And they promised that nothing would get broken. And it didn’t. That was astounding if you’re little and you think people are moving your house. But you didn’t know when. That didn’t bother me so much; that really bothered my Mother to not know when you would move.

And then you would move and you hope that whoever got moved, the schools knew they moved. So, my school knew I moved. I got to the right home.

But the day we moved – and I never knew this – my brother who was in high school, he arrived at an empty basement. And being a guy, you know, he never spoke about it until he was maybe early 60s and he started to say how sad that was.

See, so for me, it was all exciting. I heard in the morning I was going; I went. You go to school and you come home to another place. You don’t stay in your own house.

When we moved we stayed in what were called halfway houses which had running water and bathtubs. In my village home, there was no running water, no bathtub, no indoor toilet. The halfway house had all these things. It was very exciting.”


Sally Grant (née McLeod)

Sally Grant grew up in Mille Roches, Ontario





“That was very interesting ‘cause I’m, like, 12. I was really looking forward to the move.

I was enthralled with the big Hartshorne mover thing that came. And you couldn’t believe – we just had these old stone basements and they would put holes in the basement, put the beams in.

And then you sat there with the beams there but you never knew what day you were moving. You don’t know when you’re moving. And they promised that nothing would get broken. And it didn’t. That was astounding if you’re little and you think people are moving your house. But you didn’t know when. That didn’t bother me so much; that really bothered my Mother to not know when you would move.

And then you would move and you hope that whoever got moved, the schools knew they moved. So, my school knew I moved. I got to the right home.

But the day we moved – and I never knew this – my brother who was in high school, he arrived at an empty basement. And being a guy, you know, he never spoke about it until he was maybe early 60s and he started to say how sad that was.

See, so for me, it was all exciting. I heard in the morning I was going; I went. You go to school and you come home to another place. You don’t stay in your own house.

When we moved we stayed in what were called halfway houses which had running water and bathtubs. In my village home, there was no running water, no bathtub, no indoor toilet. The halfway house had all these things. It was very exciting.”



Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Sally Grant, Lost Villages Historical Society, LVHS Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 14, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Sally Grant, Lost Villages Historical Society, LVHS Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 14, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Sally Grant, Lost Villages Historical Society, LVHS Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 14, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Sally Grant, Lost Villages Historical Society, LVHS Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 14, 2013

Summary

In this video Sally Grant remembers the excitement of moving from her old house to a “half-way house” before moving into their home in Long Sault. She was realy excited about having running water and indoor plumbing. She also recounts a mix-up at school when her older brother was not told of the timing of the move and came home to an empty basement. He did not speak about this experience until he was in his early 60s.

Sally’s recollections about the Seaway are overwhelmingly positive. However, like for many others, there are mixed feelings about how this affected the lives of those in the Sunken Villages.

Bio

Sally Grant grew up in Mille Roches, Ontario. 

She now lives in Cornwall, Ontario.

Summary

In this video Sally Grant remembers the excitement of moving from her old house to a “half-way house” before moving into their home in Long Sault. She was realy excited about having running water and indoor plumbing. She also recounts a mix-up at school when her older brother was not told of the timing of the move and came home to an empty basement. He did not speak about this experience until he was in his early 60s.

Sally’s recollections about the Seaway are overwhelmingly positive. However, like for many others, there are mixed feelings about how this affected the lives of those in the Sunken Villages.

Bio

Sally Grant grew up in Mille Roches, Ontario.

She now lives in Cornwall, Ontario.



The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side, in St Lawrence County in upstate New York, Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.

The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side, in St Lawrence County in upstate New York, Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.