Island with Kayaks, Farran’s Point, Ontario, Canada
Island with Kayaks, Farran’s Point, Ontario, Canada

Island with Kayaks | N 44.58.14 W 75.00.06 | Farran’s Point, Ontario, Canada




In land and water, two unique landscapes intertwine in the St Lawrence Valley between Cardinal and Cornwall, Ontario.  In what is now known as the ’Seaway Valley’, there is an uneasy tension; first-time visitors feel something not ‘quite right’ or ‘unnatural’ about the towns and villages where old and new, rural and suburban sit in odd juxtaposition. Morrisburg is part 19th century old and 1950s new, the former mostly residential and close to the water, the latter a 1950s strip mall of shops and services fronting a modern road. Morrisburg, Iroquois, Ingleside and Long Sault have a 1950s era planned suburbia landscape that seems strange and out of place in otherwise rural Eastern Ontario.

In the water, at the edge of the odd cultural landscape on land, is an even stranger landscape of familiar things, submerged. Roads, tree stumps, settlement grids, locks, bridges and much more under water.  Despite all the official efforts to variously ignore, erase and sanitize what happened to the people who once lived here, this watery landscape - the evidence of their existence - fascinates and attracts locals and outsiders alike. It pulls on the imagination.

The watery landscape explains the peculiarities of the cultural landscape on shore. The two belong to and make sense of each other.


Island with Kayaks, Farran’s Point, Ontario, Canada
Island with Kayaks, Farran’s Point, Ontario, Canada

Island with Kayaks | N 44.58.14 W 75.00.06 | Farran’s Point, Ontario, Canada




In land and water, two unique landscapes intertwine in the St Lawrence Valley between Cardinal and Cornwall, Ontario. In what is now known as the ’Seaway Valley’, there is an uneasy tension; first-time visitors feel something not ‘quite right’ or ‘unnatural’ about the towns and villages where old and new, rural and suburban sit in odd juxtaposition. Morrisburg is part 19th century old and 1950s new, the former mostly residential and close to the water, the latter a 1950s strip mall of shops and services fronting a modern road. Morrisburg, Iroquois, Ingleside and Long Sault have a 1950s era planned suburbia landscape that seems strange and out of place in otherwise rural Eastern Ontario.

In the water, at the edge of the odd cultural landscape on land, is an even stranger landscape of familiar things, submerged. Roads, tree stumps, settlement grids, locks, bridges and much more under water. Despite all the official efforts to variously ignore, erase and sanitize what happened to the people who once lived here, this watery landscape - the evidence of their existence - fascinates and attracts locals and outsiders alike. It pulls on the imagination.

The watery landscape explains the peculiarities of the cultural landscape on shore. The two belong to and make sense of each other.