Juney Vyfvinkel (née Garlough)

Juney Vyfvinkel grew up in Cook’s Tavern at Cook’s Point west of Aultsville, Ontario.





“In a way it’s a shame that it had to happen.

But it improved … The Seaway was born and therefore more ships could come through. And so it was more successful for the country, I think, than for the people who really lived in those villages and didn’t, don’t like the idea that they were gone.

But, then again, it’s progress and that’s what happens when progress happens.”


Juney Vyfvinkel (née Garlough)

Juney Vyfvinkel grew up in Cook’s Tavern at Cook’s Point west of Aultsville, Ontario.





“In a way it’s a shame that it had to happen.

But it improved … The Seaway was born and therefore more ships could come through. And so it was more successful for the country, I think, than for the people who really lived in those villages and didn’t, don’t like the idea that they were gone.

But, then again, it’s progress and that’s what happens when progress happens.”



Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Joint interview with Juney and Henry Vyfvinkel, Lost Villages Historical Society, LVHS Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 14, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Joint interview with Juney and Henry Vyfvinkel, Lost Villages Historical Society, LVHS Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 14, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Joint interview with Juney and Henry Vyfvinkel, Lost Villages Historical Society, LVHS Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 14, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Joint interview with Juney and Henry Vyfvinkel, Lost Villages Historical Society, LVHS Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 14, 2013

Summary

In this video Juney Vyfvinkel discusses the improvements that came as a result of the Seaway and how, since people lost their villages, the benefit was more for the rest of Canada.

Those affected by the Seaway often have conflicted feelings about its pros and cons. Many still struggle with trying to understand and come to terms with their dislocation. This is not made easier by an official narrative that hardly acknowledges their dislocation; the destruction was cast as a necessary sacrifice for progress and modernity, for economic prosperity and national prestige.

Bio

Juney Vyfvinkel (née Garlough) spent much of her childhood at Cook’s Tavern set beside the highway just west of Aultsville, Ontario.

Her childhood home was of historical importance. It was destroyed during the Battle of Cryslers Farm in 1813 and then rebuilt in the 1820s. The building was salvaged and rebuilt by Upper Canada Village in the 1950s and early 1960s to represent 1867, the year of Canada’s confederation. Upper Canada Village is an historial theme park built as part of the Seaway project. 

Juney now lives in Brockville, Ontario.

Summary

In this video Juney Vyfvinkel discusses the improvements that came as a result of the Seaway and how, since people lost their villages, the benefit was more for the rest of Canada.

Those affected by the Seaway often have conflicted feelings about its pros and cons. Many still struggle with trying to understand and come to terms with their dislocation. This is not made easier by an official narrative that hardly acknowledges their dislocation; the destruction was cast as a necessary sacrifice for progress and modernity, for economic prosperity and national prestige.

Bio

Juney Vyfvinkel (née Garlough) spent much of her childhood at Cook’s Tavern set beside the highway just west of Aultsville, Ontario.

Her childhood home was of historical importance. It was destroyed during the Battle of Cryslers Farm in 1813 and then rebuilt in the 1820s. The building was salvaged and rebuilt by Upper Canada Village in the 1950s and early 1960s to represent 1867, the year of Canada’s confederation. Upper Canada Village is an historial theme park built as part of the Seaway project.

Juney now lives in Brockville, Ontario.



The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side St Lawrence County in upstate New York was affected. Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.

The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side St Lawrence County in upstate New York was affected. Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.