Patricia O’Duffy (née LaDoucer)

Patricia O’Duffy grew up in a house her family rented in Wales, Ontario.





Isabel: “Pop Stuart always carried a bag of candy in his pocket.”

Joan: “Yes! I remember that. At church.”

Isabel: “And passed it out to the kids.”

Joan: “He wasn’t supposed to give it to the kids at church and then he’d give us all candy.”

Patricia: “He’d have a suit on always. He’d have like a suit coat on, a white shirt. And then he was a real tease. He’d have a fly on his collar and he’d be looking at you and you’d say, ‘There’s a fly!’ ‘Well, hit it off!’ Well, you couldn’t because it was made of metal. And you’d hit it and then you’d realize.And then he’d have a string hanging out with thread in the pocket, you know. And then he’d say, ‘Well, pull that thread! Where’s it come from?’ You’d be pulling the thread! He was terrible.”

Joan: “He was a big jokester.”

Patricia: “He was a jokester. He had no kids. But we rented the last house in Wales from him. He owned that house. And they burned it. And I see it on one of the videos that Frannie made, burning it. It’s a funny feeling. And I always want to go on Google and look where you lived when you were a kid. I can’t. ‘Cause it’s underwater. ‘Cause a lot of my friends do that and I say, ‘I can’t do that!’ But, anyhow. Oh, I have good memories.”


Patricia O’Duffy (née LaDoucer)

Patricia O’Duffy grew up in a house her family rented in Wales, Ontario.





Isabel: “Pop Stuart always carried a bag of candy in his pocket.”

Joan: “Yes! I remember that. At church.”

Isabel: “And passed it out to the kids.”

Joan: “He wasn’t supposed to give it to the kids at church and then he’d give us all candy.”

Patricia: “He’d have a suit on always. He’d have like a suit coat on, a white shirt. And then he was a real tease. He’d have a fly on his collar and he’d be looking at you and you’d say, ‘There’s a fly!’ ‘Well, hit it off!’ Well, you couldn’t because it was made of metal. And you’d hit it and then you’d realize.And then he’d have a string hanging out with thread in the pocket, you know. And then he’d say, ‘Well, pull that thread! Where’s it come from?’ You’d be pulling the thread! He was terrible.”

Joan: “He was a big jokester.”

Patricia: “He was a jokester. He had no kids. But we rented the last house in Wales from him. He owned that house. And they burned it. And I see it on one of the videos that Frannie made, burning it. It’s a funny feeling. And I always want to go on Google and look where you lived when you were a kid. I can’t. ‘Cause it’s underwater. ‘Cause a lot of my friends do that and I say, ‘I can’t do that!’ But, anyhow. Oh, I have good memories.”



Video Interview 1



Video Excerpt: Joan McEwan (joint interview with Patricia O’Duffy & Isabel Hunter), Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview 2



Video Excerpt: Joan McEwan (joint interview with Patricia O’Duffy & Isabel Hunter), Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview 1



Video Excerpt: Joan McEwan (joint interview with Patricia O’Duffy & Isabel Hunter), Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview 2



Video Excerpt: Joan McEwan (joint interview with Patricia O’Duffy & Isabel Hunter), Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview 1



Video Excerpt: Joan McEwan (joint interview with Patricia O’Duffy & Isabel Hunter), Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview 2



Video Excerpt: Joan McEwan (joint interview with Patricia O’Duffy & Isabel Hunter), Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview 1



Video Excerpt: Joan McEwan (joint interview with Patricia O’Duffy & Isabel Hunter), Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview 2



Video Excerpt: Joan McEwan (joint interview with Patricia O’Duffy & Isabel Hunter), Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Summary

In the first video Patricia O'Duffy, Joan McEwan and Isabel Hunter remember a wonderful character, Pop Stuart. Patricia then talks about how they rented his house until it was burned down. She also laments not being able to look up her childhood home on Google because it is now underwater.

In the second video Patricia recalls babysitting for various families including the Goslings where she babysat the movie star Ryan Gosling’s father. Then the three talk about how with the exception of a few rich families everyone was in the same circumstances. They recall old Dr. Brown from Aultsvile who made house calls driving his old Model T and would only charge 50 cents.

Bio

Patricia O’Duffy (née LaDoucer) grew up in a house her family rented from Pop Stuart in Wales, Ontario.

She now lives in Morrisburg and maintains a close relationship with her childhood friends from Wales.

atricia ODuffy on bike in front of Laflamme Barber shop in Wales 1956

Patricia O'Duffy on her bike in front of the Laflamme Barber shop in Wales in 1956

Patricia ODuffy (1950s) in bathing suit sitting on wall at Dr Moody's House in Wales

Patricia O'Duffy (1950s) in bathing suit sitting on wall at Dr Moody's House in Wales

Summary

In the first video Patricia O'Duffy, Joan McEwan and Isabel Hunter remember a wonderful character, Pop Stuart. Patricia then talks about how they rented his house until it was burned down. She also laments not being able to look up her childhood home on Google because it is now underwater.

In the second video Patricia recalls babysitting for various families including the Goslings where she babysat the movie star Ryan Gosling’s father. Then the three talk about how with the exception of a few rich families everyone was in the same circumstances. They recall old Dr. Brown from Aultsvile who made house calls driving his old Model T and would only charge 50 cents.

Bio

Patricia O’Duffy (née LaDoucer) grew up in a house her family rented from Pop Stuart in Wales, Ontario.

She now lives in Morrisburg and maintains a close relationship with her childhood friends from Wales.

atricia ODuffy on bike in front of Laflamme Barber shop in Wales 1956

Patricia O'Duffy on her bike in front of the Laflamme Barber shop in Wales in 1956

Patricia ODuffy (1950s) in bathing suit sitting on wall at Dr Moody's House in Wales

Patricia O'Duffy (1950s) in bathing suit sitting on wall at Dr Moody's House in Wales



The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side, in St Lawrence County in upstate New York, Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.

The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side, in St Lawrence County in upstate New York, Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.