John McIntyre

John McIntyre grew up in Mille Roches, Ontario.





“In the way that people would be displaced by not just the oil sands or the way they’re being developed… But when you see that development happening, when you see that they’re talking about starting up new mining developments in the far North right now and people will probably be uprooted or moved a little bit.

People from Attawapiskat – they’re talking about moving them certainly away from the flooding. And, yeah, it does seem like they should be moved away a little bit from where they are but on the other… they also have their ancestors buried there.

It all sort of ties in together with the way that we can move people, the way we should take other… not just pick up and leave, but have people move in… using a, oh, what can I say? A sense of… Leaving them with a sense of dignity, at least. And a sense of still being able to revisit or making sure that they belong where they’re going.

I think one of the fears is of having to move away and moving away from your friends. Things won’t be the same as they were before. And of course they won’t be. But there needs to be a little bit of a sense of some things can be very similar or some things can work well.

But also there needs to be a reason for it to happen and a reason that affords people a better opportunity than what they have now.”






John McIntyre

John McIntyre grew up in Mille Roches, Ontario.





“In the way that people would be displaced by not just the oil sands or the way they’re being developed… But when you see that development happening, when you see that they’re talking about starting up new mining developments in the far North right now and people will probably be uprooted or moved a little bit.

People from Attawapiskat – they’re talking about moving them certainly away from the flooding. And, yeah, it does seem like they should be moved away a little bit from where they are but on the other… they also have their ancestors buried there.

It all sort of ties in together with the way that we can move people, the way we should take other… not just pick up and leave, but have people move in… using a, oh, what can I say? A sense of… Leaving them with a sense of dignity, at least. And a sense of still being able to revisit or making sure that they belong where they’re going.

I think one of the fears is of having to move away and moving away from your friends. Things won’t be the same as they were before. And of course they won’t be. But there needs to be a little bit of a sense of some things can be very similar or some things can work well.

But also there needs to be a reason for it to happen and a reason that affords people a better opportunity than what they have now.”







Video Interview



Video Excerpt: John McIntyre, Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: John McIntyre, Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: John McIntyre, Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: John McIntyre, Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Summary

In this video John McIntyre once of Mille Roches relates what happened when people were moved for the Seaway with people being moved for oil sands development, other mining and the situation in Attawapiskat. He discusses the need to treat people with a sense of dignity even if the move is necessary.

Without knowing the history of the lost villages many have little awareness of the trauma people experienced with their dislocation. Whatever the rationale an authority has for displacing people - whether or not they are willing - it should be incumbent on them to treat people fairly and with respect. Just pretending that people were not harmed and ignoring what occurred only serves to reinforce the trauma.

Bio

John McIntyre grew up in Milles Roche, Ontario.

He now lives in Long Sault, Ontario. 

Summary

In this video John McIntyre once of Mille Roches relates what happened when people were moved for the Seaway with people being moved for oil sands development, other mining and the situation in Attawapiskat. He discusses the need to treat people with a sense of dignity even if the move is necessary.

Without knowing the history of the lost villages many have little awareness of the trauma people experienced with their dislocation. Whatever the rationale an authority has for displacing people - whether or not they are willing - it should be incumbent on them to treat people fairly and with respect. Just pretending that people were not harmed and ignoring what occurred only serves to reinforce the trauma.

Bio

John McIntyre grew up in Milles Roche, Ontario.

He now lives in Long Sault, Ontario. 



The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side St Lawrence County in upstate New York was affected. Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.

The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side St Lawrence County in upstate New York was affected. Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.