Rosemary Rutley

Rosemary Rutley grew up in Woodlands, Ontario. 





“Some of the men had come down and a camp had been made across from where I was teaching; they had made a camp there. And I think they just slept there. I’m not sure – maybe they didn’t, but their trucks were all there, it was the guys working on the Seaway.
Of course, when you’re 17 it was kind of fun! You’re looking to see all these good looking young fellows going back. And I can remember at that time girls did not… weren’t forward at any time.

But one day this good looking fellow come in and, oh, he was, I don’t know, about the size of, tall as Max, just real, good looking fellow. And just talked and he was kind of bored, too, so … In the long run, I took my car and my parents let me and I drove him to the drive-in in Cornwall which was something you don’t usually do!

But that was… it was fun.”


Rosemary Rutley

Rosemary Rutley grew up in Woodlands, Ontario.





“Some of the men had come down and a camp had been made across from where I was teaching; they had made a camp there. And I think they just slept there. I’m not sure – maybe they didn’t, but their trucks were all there, it was the guys working on the Seaway.
Of course, when you’re 17 it was kind of fun! You’re looking to see all these good looking young fellows going back. And I can remember at that time girls did not… weren’t forward at any time.

But one day this good looking fellow come in and, oh, he was, I don’t know, about the size of, tall as Max, just real, good looking fellow. And just talked and he was kind of bored, too, so … In the long run, I took my car and my parents let me and I drove him to the drive-in in Cornwall which was something you don’t usually do!

But that was… it was fun.”



Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Rosemary Rutley, Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Rosemary Rutley, Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Rosemary Rutley, Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Rosemary Rutley, Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Summary

In this video clip Rosemary Rutley remembers the influx of young men who came to work on the construction of the Seaway, how they had a work camp near to where she taught and the fun of going to the drive-in in Cornwall.

The construction of the St Lawrence Seaway wrought many social and cultural changes in the valley. The influx of workers from across Canada and around the world changed the social dynamics of the entire valley on both sides of the river.

Bio

Rosemary Rutley grew up in Woodlands, Ontario. 

Rosemary is Past-President and remains an active member of the Lost Villages Historical Society.

She now lives in Ingleside, Ontario.

Summary

In this video clip Rosemary Rutley remembers the influx of young men who came to work on the construction of the Seaway, how they had a work camp near to where she taught and the fun of going to the drive-in in Cornwall.

The construction of the St Lawrence Seaway wrought many social and cultural changes in the valley. The influx of workers from across Canada and around the world changed the social dynamics of the entire valley on both sides of the river.

Bio

Rosemary Rutley grew up in Woodlands, Ontario.

Rosemary is Past-President and remains an active member of the Lost Villages Historical Society.

She now lives in Ingleside, Ontario.



The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side St Lawrence County in upstate New York was affected. Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.

The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side St Lawrence County in upstate New York was affected. Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.