Kings Highway No2, Woodlands, Ontario, Canada

Kings Highway No2 | N 44.58.59 W 74.59.11 | Woodlands, Ontario, Canada




The submerged highway running through the hamlet of Woodlands, Ontario which disappeared under the waters of newly created Lake St Lawrence on July 1, 1958. Giant carp swim in the seaweed where farms once grew more conventional crops.

Founded in 1784 by German-speaking Loyalists from New York fleeing the American Revolution, Woodlands had a population of about 70 people at the time of the Inundation. Besides farming this area was well known to tourists wishing to hear and see the mighty Long Sault Rapids. In the 1950s cottages lined the riverside, facing the river to their front with King’s Highway No 2 behind them.

King’s Highway No 2 in Ontario was once part of a series of identically numbered roads connecting Windsor, Ontario with Halifax, Nova Scotia. The construction of the Seaway prompted the construction of a new, modern four lane divided highway to replace Highway 2. The piece built near Morrisburg became one of the first sections of Highway 401 in the mid-1950s.


Kings Highway No2, Woodlands, Ontario, Canada

Kings Highway No2 | N 44.58.59 W 74.59.11 | Woodlands, Ontario, Canada




The submerged highway running through the hamlet of Woodlands, Ontario which disappeared under the waters of newly created Lake St Lawrence on July 1, 1958. Giant carp swim in the seaweed where farms once grew more conventional crops.

Founded in 1784 by German-speaking Loyalists from New York fleeing the American Revolution, Woodlands had a population of about 70 people at the time of the Inundation. Besides farming this area was well known to tourists wishing to hear and see the mighty Long Sault Rapids. In the 1950s cottages lined the riverside, facing the river to their front with King’s Highway No 2 behind them.

King’s Highway No 2 in Ontario was once part of a series of identically numbered roads connecting Windsor, Ontario with Halifax, Nova Scotia. The construction of the Seaway prompted the construction of a new, modern four lane divided highway to replace Highway 2. The piece built near Morrisburg became one of the first sections of Highway 401 in the mid-1950s.