David Hill

David Hill grew up in Mille Roches, Ontario.





“My Dad used to tell the story – well, of course, Bill’s Dad was involved in this.

There was a gentleman in our village of Moulinette. He liked to talk and he was sort of politically connected and he said, ‘We can’t sell, we have to stick together, no one sells until we all feel comfortable.’

Well, he was the first one to sell.

And then it just seemed like … It was a lot of pressure on people of our parents’ age because they not only had to think of themselves, they – in Bill’s case, there was his grandmother; in our case, my grandmother, grandfather and other grandmother. And there was a lot of pressure on our parents.”


David Hill

David Hill grew up in Mille Roches, Ontario.





“My Dad used to tell the story – well, of course, Bill’s Dad was involved in this.

There was a gentleman in our village of Moulinette. He liked to talk and he was sort of politically connected and he said, ‘We can’t sell, we have to stick together, no one sells until we all feel comfortable.’

Well, he was the first one to sell.

And then it just seemed like … It was a lot of pressure on people of our parents’ age because they not only had to think of themselves, they – in Bill’s case, there was his grandmother; in our case, my grandmother, grandfather and other grandmother. And there was a lot of pressure on our parents.”



Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Joint interview David Hill and Bill Gallinger, Lost Villages Historical Society, LVHS Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Joint interview David Hill and Bill Gallinger, Lost Villages Historical Society, LVHS Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Joint interview David Hill and Bill Gallinger, Lost Villages Historical Society, LVHS Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Joint interview David Hill and Bill Gallinger, Lost Villages Historical Society, LVHS Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Summary

In video of David Hill’s joint interview with his childhood friend Bill Gallinger, David talks about the pressure that his parents would have felt as community members negotiated with Hydro as individuals.

There was considerable inequity in what compensation people received from Ontario Hydro for the exporiation of their houses and land. Hydro engaged a team of agents who negotiated individual arrangements; some people stood their ground and secured much better terms than others intimidated by the process.

Bio

David Hill grew up in Mille Roches, Ontario.

David is an active member of the Lost Villages Historical Society.

He now resides in Cornwall, Ontario. 

Summary

In video of David Hill’s joint interview with his childhood friend Bill Gallinger, David talks about the pressure that his parents would have felt as community members negotiated with Hydro as individuals.

There was considerable inequity in what compensation people received from Ontario Hydro for the exporiation of their houses and land. Hydro engaged a team of agents who negotiated individual arrangements; some people stood their ground and secured much better terms than others intimidated by the process.

Bio

David Hill grew up in Moulinette, Ontario.

David is an active member of the Lost Villages Historical Society.

He now resides in Cornwall, Ontario. 



The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side St Lawrence County in upstate New York was affected. Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.

The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side St Lawrence County in upstate New York was affected. Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.