Joan McEwan (née MacLeod)

Joan McEwan’s first teaching job was in Moulinette. She was then moved with her students to Mille Roches and finally Long Sault, Ontario





“I started teaching in 1956 in Moulinette. And the two guys you interviewed before, I taught both of them. Well, David when he was in grade 6 and Doug when he was in grade 5.

And I was in Moulinette school until we … The town disappeared while we were there. Then in… ’56, ’57… In the fall of – would it be ’57? – they moved us to Mille Roches.

And in those days nobody packed up your stuff, you had to do all that yourself. Kids had things in paper bags and we got them on the bus and there were paper bags breaking and stuff rolling all over the floor. That’s one thing I remember: Trying to collect all this stuff afterward and get it back to the right person.

Anyway, and then we were in Mille Roches until February of 1958 before Long Sault School was ready. And while that was happening, the town of Mille Roches was disappearing. The only thing left by that time – I think they were just tearing down the Catholic Church which was beside the school, when we moved out and went to Long Sault.”


Joan McEwan (née MacLeod)

Joan McEwan’s first teaching job was in Moulinette. She was then moved with her students to Mille Roches and finally Long Sault, Ontario





“I started teaching in 1956 in Moulinette. And the two guys you interviewed before, I taught both of them. Well, David when he was in grade 6 and Doug when he was in grade 5.

And I was in Moulinette school until we … The town disappeared while we were there. Then in… ’56, ’57… In the fall of – would it be ’57? – they moved us to Mille Roches.

And in those days nobody packed up your stuff, you had to do all that yourself. Kids had things in paper bags and we got them on the bus and there were paper bags breaking and stuff rolling all over the floor. That’s one thing I remember: Trying to collect all this stuff afterward and get it back to the right person.

Anyway, and then we were in Mille Roches until February of 1958 before Long Sault School was ready. And while that was happening, the town of Mille Roches was disappearing. The only thing left by that time – I think they were just tearing down the Catholic Church which was beside the school, when we moved out and went to Long Sault.”



Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Joan McEwan (joint interview with Patricia O’Duffy & Isabel Hunter), Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Joan McEwan (joint interview with Patricia O’Duffy & Isabel Hunter), Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Joan McEwan (joint interview with Patricia O’Duffy & Isabel Hunter), Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Joan McEwan (joint interview with Patricia O’Duffy & Isabel Hunter), Lost Villages Historical Society Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Summary

In this video Joan McEwan recalls how fresh from teacher’s training she began her teaching career in 1956 in Moulinette, Ontario. She stayed there with her students until the town disappeared around them and they were moved to the school in Mille Roches. Mille Roches was, in turn, dismantled with the school building the last to go and they finally moved to a new school in the newly built town of Long Sault.

Bio

Joan McEwan (née MacLeod) grew up on a farm near Wales. Fresh from her own schooling in Wales, with a couple of months of teacher training, she then taught in two of the Sunken Villages in Moulinette and Mille Roches before moving with her students to a new school in Long Sault, Ontario.

Now retired, she lives in Ingleside, Ontario. 

Summary

In this video Joan McEwan recalls how fresh from teacher’s training she began her teaching career in 1956 in Moulinette, Ontario. She stayed there with her students until the town disappeared around them and they were moved to the school in Mille Roches. Mille Roches was, in turn, dismantled with the school building the last to go and they finally moved to a new school in the newly built town of Long Sault.

Bio

Joan McEwan (née MacLeod) grew up on a farm near Wales. Fresh from her own schooling in Wales, with a couple of months of teacher training, she then taught in two of the Sunken Villages in Moulinette and Mille Roches before moving with her students to a new school in Long Sault, Ontario.

Now retired, she lives in Ingleside, Ontario. 



The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side, in St Lawrence County in upstate New York, Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.

The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side, in St Lawrence County in upstate New York, Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.