Lyle Van Allen

Lyle Van Allen grew up in Williamstown, Ontario.





“I used to show my pictures in conjunction with Fran Laflamme and her pictures dealt mostly with the Lost Villages.

And Fran and I, we were on council at the same time. She was Osnabruck and I was in Williamsburg. And we would sort of argue back and forth, all in fun.

She took the point of view it was a terrible thing. And I always took the point of view it was a great thing. And I think we were both right, quite frankly.

But one day she said to me, she says, ‘You know, Lyle, my father was a barber in Wales and he was a very strong-willed man. By the time Hydro finished talking to him, he was bawling and crying.’

And I never argued with Fran after that. You know, she witnessed a part of it I didn’t witness.”


Lyle Van Allen

Lyle Van Allen grew up in Williamstown, Ontario.





“I used to show my pictures in conjunction with Fran Laflamme and her pictures dealt mostly with the Lost Villages.

And Fran and I, we were on council at the same time. She was Osnabruck and I was in Williamsburg. And we would sort of argue back and forth, all in fun.

She took the point of view it was a terrible thing. And I always took the point of view it was a great thing. And I think we were both right, quite frankly.

But one day she said to me, she says, ‘You know, Lyle, my father was a barber in Wales and he was a very strong-willed man. By the time Hydro finished talking to him, he was bawling and crying.’

And I never argued with Fran after that. You know, she witnessed a part of it I didn’t witness.”



Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Lyle Van Allen, Winchester, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Lyle Van Allen, Winchester, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Lyle Van Allen, Winchester, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Lyle Van Allen, Winchester, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Summary

In this video clip Lyle Van Allen of Williamsburg discusses conversations he would have with Fran LaFlamme about the Seaway. He thought it was a good thing; she did not. He now figures they were both right.

Like many mega-projects the St Lawrence Seaway had many supporters, including many in Eastern Ontario who benefited from the bonanza of contracting and construction work.

The situation becomes more complicated for those who were directly affected. Fran LaFlamme was the founding President of the Lost Villages Historical Society a community response 20 years after to Inundation to preserve and protect the memory and legacies of the lost villages. 

Bio

Lyle Van Allen grew up and continues to live in Williamsburg, Ontario.

His family was involved in contract machinery work for the construction of the Seaway. He has been a councillor. He keeps the memory of the lost villages alive through a collection of photographs from before and after the construction of the Seaway which he shares publicly. 

Summary

In this video clip Lyle Van Allen of Williamsburg discusses conversations he would have with Fran LaFlamme about the Seaway. He thought it was a good thing; she did not. He now figures they were both right.

Like many mega-projects the St Lawrence Seaway had many supporters, including many in Eastern Ontario who benefited from the bonanza of contracting and construction work.

The situation becomes more complicated for those who were directly affected. Fran LaFlamme was the founding President of the Lost Villages Historical Society a community response 20 years after to Inundation to preserve and protect the memory and legacies of the lost villages. 

Bio

Lyle Van Allen has always lived in Williamsburg, Ontario.

His family was involved in contract machinery work for the construction of the Seaway. He has been a councillor. He keeps the memory of the lost villages alive through a collection of photographs from before and after the construction of the Seaway which he shares publicly. 



The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side St Lawrence County in upstate New York was affected. Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.

The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side St Lawrence County in upstate New York was affected. Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.