Dale Ault

Dale Ault grew up in Aultsville, Ontario. He now lives in Brantford, Ontario





“All I remember was it was going to be a great project and it was going to make shipping so much bigger and greater.

And from what I understand, what I read and heard, I don’t think it ever came up to the expectations of what they thought, the tonnage they thought they would have, the ocean liners they thought would be going through.

And I think the projection was good, but I think the result, I think that’s what made quite a few people bitter, too. That it never really came out to the expectations that they had for it.”


Jim Brownell

Dale Ault grew up in Aultsville, Ontario. He now lives in Brantford, Ontario





“All I remember was it was going to be a great project and it was going to make shipping so much bigger and greater.

And from what I understand, what I read and heard, I don’t think it ever came up to the expectations of what they thought, the tonnage they thought they would have, the ocean liners they thought would be going through.

And I think the projection was good, but I think the result, I think that’s what made quite a few people bitter, too. That it never really came out to the expectations that they had for it.”



Video Interview



Audio Excerpt: Dale Ault, Brantford, Ontario. August 5, 2013

Video Interview



Audio Excerpt: Dale Ault, Brantford, Ontario. August 5, 2013

Video Interview



Audio Excerpt: Dale Ault, Brantford, Ontario. August 5, 2013

Video Interview



Audio Excerpt: Dale Ault, Brantford, Ontario. August 5, 2013

Summary

In this audio clip Dale Ault discusses how the projections for the Seaway were quite grand but that many expectations were not met, resulting in some people becoming bitter.

Great promises were made before and during the construction of St Lawrence Seaway about the industrial development and economic opportunities that would follow. Few of these promises were realized. The loss of homes and communities was framed as a sacrifice for the common good, for the economic well being of all Canadians. Locally the area was to become a centre of industrial development, jobs and prosperity. This never happened.

Bio

Dale Ault spent his early teen years in Aultsville, Ontario where he was raised by his grandmother in the home their family had owned since the 1800s.

He lelt Aultsville to work as a copy boy for the Cornwall Standard Freeholder before the area was razed for the Seaway. On occasional trips back to Aultsville he witnessed the step by step destruction of the area until Aultsville was also leveled.

Dale spent his entire career in the newspaper business at different locations around Ontario.

He now lives in Brantford, Ontario. 

Summary

In this audio clip Dale Ault discusses how the projections for the Seaway were quite grand but that many expectations were not met, resulting in some people becoming bitter.

Great promises were made before and during the construction of St Lawrence Seaway about the industrial development and economic opportunities that would follow. Few of these promises were realized. The loss of homes and communities was framed as a sacrifice for the common good, for the economic well being of all Canadians. Locally the area was to become a centre of industrial development, jobs and prosperity. This never happened.

Bio

Dale Ault spent his early teen years in Aultsville, Ontario where he was raised by his grandmother in the home their family had owned since the 1800s.

He lelt Aultsville to work as a copy boy for the Cornwall Standard Freeholder before the area was razed for the Seaway. On occasional trips back to Aultsville he witnessed the step by step destruction of the area until Aultsville was also leveled.

Dale spent his entire career in the newspaper business at different locations around Ontario.

He now lives in Brantford, Ontario. 



The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side St Lawrence County in upstate New York was affected. Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.

The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side St Lawrence County in upstate New York was affected. Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.