Liliane McKennirey (née Lalondé)

Liliane McKennirey grew up in Wales, Ontario.





“Having read Maggie Wheeler’s books, it made me think about the psychology, the ramifications to people’s morale for having lost their home, their everything. And being relocated, yes, being relocated but…

I’m not sure. I haven’t met anybody else that was as affected and perhaps I just don’t remember. But I do remember friends whose houses were moved to either Long Sault or Ingleside and, you know, it was so too bad, we lost this… But on the other hand, they still had their house that was physically moved.

Particularly in her book, she just has snippets of explanations of where her mysterious characters are looking for clues, for who did the murder. And a lot of it has to do with the Upper Canada. But it’s just little snippets here and there.

And I thought, oh yeah. I can’t tell you them right now because I did read her books quite a while ago, but I just remember the effect that it had on me and it was mainly the psychological effect of having lost… because she was explaining in some of her books the losses I guess that were happening to people because they had lost this and they were doing something else and the weaving that she was doing in her story building just reminded me of the feelings that I was harboring, that had never been visited.

And finally it made me think and I thought, okay, I’m glad that’s finished. I can indeed move on.”


Liliane McKennirey (née Lalondé)

Liliane McKennirey grew up in Wales, Ontario.





“Having read Maggie Wheeler’s books, it made me think about the psychology, the ramifications to people’s morale for having lost their home, their everything. And being relocated, yes, being relocated but…

I’m not sure. I haven’t met anybody else that was as affected and perhaps I just don’t remember. But I do remember friends whose houses were moved to either Long Sault or Ingleside and, you know, it was so too bad, we lost this… But on the other hand, they still had their house that was physically moved.

Particularly in her book, she just has snippets of explanations of where her mysterious characters are looking for clues, for who did the murder. And a lot of it has to do with the Upper Canada. But it’s just little snippets here and there.

And I thought, oh yeah. I can’t tell you them right now because I did read her books quite a while ago, but I just remember the effect that it had on me and it was mainly the psychological effect of having lost… because she was explaining in some of her books the losses I guess that were happening to people because they had lost this and they were doing something else and the weaving that she was doing in her story building just reminded me of the feelings that I was harboring, that had never been visited.

And finally it made me think and I thought, okay, I’m glad that’s finished. I can indeed move on.”



Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Liliane McKennirey (née Lalondé), Ottawa, Ontario. November 30, 2012

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Liliane McKennirey (née Lalondé), Ottawa, Ontario. November 30, 2012

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Liliane McKennirey (née Lalondé), Ottawa, Ontario. November 30, 2012

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Liliane McKennirey (née Lalondé), Ottawa, Ontario. November 30, 2012

Summary

In this video clip Liliane Mckennirey reflects on the effect that Maggie Wheeler's book had on her as she came to terms with her own losses from the Seaway.

The story of the Sunken Villages as a real life manifesation of the flood as a metaphor in many cultures - Noah’s Ark, Turtle Island, Atlantis - has inspired a number of creative, cultural responses that help make sense of the trauma and dislocation caused by Seaway. Maggie Wheeler has written a series of mystery books set in the lost villages.

Bio

Liliane McKennirey (née Lalondé) grew up in Wales, Ontario. Some of her earliest memories include skating on Hopple Creek with her older brother. 

She now lives in Ottawa, Ontario. 

Summary

In this video clip Liliane Mckennirey reflects on the effect that Maggie Wheeler's book had on her as she came to terms with her own losses from the Seaway.

The story of the Sunken Villages as a real life manifesation of the flood as a metaphor in many cultures - Noah’s Ark, Turtle Island, Atlantis - has inspired a number of creative, cultural responses that help make sense of the trauma and dislocation caused by Seaway. Maggie Wheeler has written a series of mystery books set in the lost villages.

Bio

Liliane McKennirey (née Lalondé) grew up in Wales, Ontario. Some of her earliest memories include skating on Hopple Creek with her older brother.

She now lives in Ottawa, Ontario. 



The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side St Lawrence County in upstate New York was affected. Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.

The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side St Lawrence County in upstate New York was affected. Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.