Craig Stevenson

Craig Stevenson is a descendant. He grew up visiting his grandfather’s cottage built on land provided to him as compensation for the farm he lost on Sheek’s Island.





“That was something. Because, you know, you get the whole variability of ... you have the people for whom this thing was a disaster, right?

Jim talks about his friend watching his house burn down. How do you touch that? It’s incredible.

And I almost feel guilty. I mean, I can sit here and talk about what a wonderful thing it was. For me. But it wasn’t wonderful, obviously, for everyone involved.

And, yeah, I’ve often thought about the fact that, on a personal level, a lot of the stuff that were really important to me as a kid came at the expense of something else.

So, there it is.”


Craig Stevenson

Craig Stevenson is a descendant. He grew up visiting his grandfather’s cottage built on land provided to him as compensation for the farm he lost on Sheek’s Island.





“That was something. Because, you know, you get the whole variability of ... you have the people for whom this thing was a disaster, right?

Jim talks about his friend watching his house burn down. How do you touch that? It’s incredible.

And I almost feel guilty. I mean, I can sit here and talk about what a wonderful thing it was. For me. But it wasn’t wonderful, obviously, for everyone involved.

And, yeah, I’ve often thought about the fact that, on a personal level, a lot of the stuff that were really important to me as a kid came at the expense of something else.

So, there it is.”



Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Craig Stevenson, Lost Villages Historical Society, LVHS Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Craig Stevenson, Lost Villages Historical Society, LVHS Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Craig Stevenson, Lost Villages Historical Society, LVHS Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: Craig Stevenson, Lost Villages Historical Society, LVHS Schoolhouse, Long Sault, Ontario. August 22, 2013

Summary

In this emotional video Craig Stevenson discusses the variety of responses to the Seaway and reflects on how things that were important to him as a kid came at the expense of others and something else.

The loss suffered by those who lost their homes and communities to the Seaway extends to their descendants. 

Bio

Craig Stevenson’s grandfather had a farm on Sheek’s Island. As compensation for his expropriation the authorities granted him a surveyed plot in what was farmland, but became a riverfront land on an island once the waters rose. 

Craig visited his grandfather's cottage when he was growing up. Some of this fondest childhood memories of learning to skate on the ice in the winter and to swim in summer were formed here.

He lives in Kemptville, Ontario and teaches high school in Avonmore.

Summary

In this emotional video Craig Stevenson discusses the variety of responses to the Seaway and reflects on how things that were important to him as a kid came at the expense of others and something else.

The loss suffered by those who lost their homes and communities to the Seaway extends to their descendants. 

Bio

Craig Stevenson’s grandfather had a farm on Sheek’s Island. As compensation for his expropriation the authorities granted him a surveyed plot in what was farmland, but became a riverfront land on an island once the waters rose.

Craig visited his grandfather's cottage when he was growing up. Some of this fondest childhood memories of learning to skate on the ice in the winter and to swim in summer were formed here.

He lives in Kemptville, Ontario and teaches high school in Avonmore.



The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side St Lawrence County in upstate New York was affected. Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.

The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side St Lawrence County in upstate New York was affected. Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.