George May

George May was a Bell Telephone project engineer who established the telephone infrastructure in ‘Town One’ which became Ingleside, Ontario





“The feeling that I try to maintain on it is the fact that there was a lot of electricity generated in that power house, there.

If you total up what entered into New York and what came into Canada, there were a lot of people benefited from all that electricity. That’s the plus side.

The down side, of course, is the disappearance of those municipalities that were around there for a long, long time. And then they were suddenly, they suddenly disappeared.”


George May

George May was a Bell Telephone project engineer who established the telephone infrastructure in ‘Town One’ which became Ingleside, Ontario





“The feeling that I try to maintain on it is the fact that there was a lot of electricity generated in that power house, there.

If you total up what entered into New York and what came into Canada, there were a lot of people benefited from all that electricity. That’s the plus side.

The down side, of course, is the disappearance of those municipalities that were around there for a long, long time. And then they were suddenly, they suddenly disappeared.”



Video Interview



Video Excerpt: George May Interview, Colonel By Retirement Residence, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. August 30, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: George May Interview, Colonel By Retirement Residence, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. August 30, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: George May Interview, Colonel By Retirement Residence, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. August 30, 2013

Video Interview



Video Excerpt: George May Interview, Colonel By Retirement Residence, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. August 30, 2013

Summary

In this video clip George May sets out what he sees as the pros and cons of St Lawrence Seaway project. Ingleside was a brand-new clean-sheet ultra-modern place established to house the people from the communities of Aultsville, Farran's Point, Wales and Dickinson's Landing, all destroyed by the construction of the Seaway.

Bio

George May was a recently graduated engineer from Queens University. His first job as a project engineer was with Bell Telephone on the Seaway Project establishing the telephone infrastructure in ‘Town One’ (so called because it was the closest to Toronto) which became Ingleside, Ontario. He spent his entire career with Bell.

Summary

In this video clip George May sets out what he sees as the pros and cons of St Lawrence Seaway project. Ingleside was a brand-new clean-sheet ultra-modern place established to house the people from the communities of Aultsville, Farran's Point, Wales and Dickinson's Landing, all destroyed by the construction of the Seaway.

Bio

George May was a recently graduated engineer from Queens University. His first job as a project engineer was with Bell Telephone on the Seaway Project establishing the telephone infrastructure in ‘Town One’ (so called because it was the closest to Toronto) which became Ingleside, Ontario. He spent his entire career with Bell.



The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side, in St Lawrence County in upstate New York, Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.

The Sunken Villages interviews give voice, sometimes for the first time, to the memories, emotions, experiences and reflections about what happened when the construction of the Seaway flooded the St Lawrence Valley. These first person accounts are reviving a history that has been officially ignored and largely forgotten.

July 1, 1958 is remembered as Inundation Day around Cornwall, Ontario and Massena, NY. At 08:00 a controlled explosion tore open a cofferdam. Four days later an area that had been home to 7,500 people disappeared under the waves of Lake St. Lawrence, part of the newly created St. Lawrence Seaway.

On the Canadian side, 12 communities, some dating back to the 1700s, were affected. Maple Grove, Mille Roches, Moulinette, Sheeks Island, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point and Aultsville were entirely destroyed. Iroquis was demolished and moved a mile to continue on in name. About half of Morrisburg – including its waterfront and most of its business district and main street – were levelled.

On the American side, in St Lawrence County in upstate New York, Croil's Island, Louisville Landing, and Richards Landing ceased to exist, and parts of Waddington were dismantled.